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The Facts

  • 1 in 5 college women are survivors of rape or attempted rape.
  • 2-8%
    2%-8% of rape accusations are false; This is the same for other crimes.
  • 26% of gay men experienced gender violence by an intimate partner.
  • 37% of bisexual men experienced gender violence by an intimate partner.
  • 44% of lesbian women experienced gender violence by an intimate partner.
  • 6%
    6% of male college students are survivors of rape or attempted rape.
  • 61% of bisexual women experienced gender violence by an intimate partner.
  • 90%
    90% of victims of sexual assault know their attacker.
  • 95% of rapes on college campuses go unreported.
  • The lifetime prevalence of intimate partner violence for heterosexual men is 29%
  • The lifetime prevalence of intimate partner violence for heterosexual women is 35%
  • Sexual Harrassment

    The term “sexual harassment,” whether between people of different sexes or the same sex, includes, but is not limited to, unwelcome sexual advances, requests for sexual favors, sexual assault and other verbal, non-verbal, electronic or physical conduct of a sexual nature when:

    ·         submission to such conduct is implicitly or explicitly a term or condition of an individual’s employment or participation in an educational program;

    ·         submission to or rejection of such conduct by an individual is used as the basis for personnel decisions or for academic evaluation or advancement; or

    ·         such conduct creates a hostile environment (“hostile environment”).

    Examples of conduct that may, depending on the facts and circumstances, constitute sexual harassment include, but are not limited to: making comments about someone’s appearance in a sexually suggestive way; staring at someone or making obscene gestures or noises; repeatedly asking someone on a date; stalking (including cyber stalking); “flashing” or exposing body parts; spreading sexual rumors; rating peers or colleagues with respect to sexual performance; non-consensual observation, photographing, or recording of sexual activity or nudity; non-consensual distribution or dissemination of photographs or recordings of sexual activity or nudity, including distribution or dissemination of photographs or recordings that were made consensually; allowing a third party to observe sexual activity without the consent of all parties; and prostituting or trafficking another person. In evaluating allegations of sexual harassment, the University considers all relevant evidence, weighs a variety of factors, and evaluates the conduct at issue from both a subjective and objective perspective.

    A “hostile environment” results from unwelcome and discriminatory conduct that is so severe, pervasive, or persistent that it unreasonably interferes with, limits, or deprives a member of the community of the ability to participate in or to receive benefits, services, or opportunities from the University’s education or employment programs and/or activities. A hostile environment can be the result of acts committed by any individual or individuals, including any member of the University community. To assess whether the alleged conduct has created a hostile environment, the University considers all relevant evidence, weighs a variety of factors, and evaluates the conduct at issue from both a subjective and objective perspective.

  • Sexual Assault

    The term “sexual assault” includes, but is not limited to:  

    • Nonconsensual Sexual Intercourse or Rape, which is any act of sexual intercourse with another individual against a person’s will or without consent, where sexual intercourse includes vaginal or anal penetration, however slight, with any body part or object, or oral penetration involving mouth to genital contact.
    • Nonconsensual Sexual Contact, includes: fondling, which is any intentional touching of the intimate parts of another person or causing another to touch one’s intimate parts against a person’s will or without consent, where intimate parts may include genitalia, groin, breast, or buttocks, or clothing covering them, or any other body part that is touched in a sexual manner; disrobing or exposure of another against a person’s will or without consent; other sexual acts or sexual contact against a person’s will or without consent; sexual battery; sexual coercion; and attempted non-consensual sexual intercourse. 
    • Incest, which is sexual intercourse between persons who are related to each other within the degrees wherein marriage is prohibited by law.
    • Statutory Rape, which is sexual intercourse with a person who is under the statutory age of consent.

    Resistance of any form need not occur to fulfill the definition of sexual assault.

  • Relationship Violence

    The term “relationship violence” means dating violence and domestic violence.

    Dating Violence*The term “dating violence” means violence committed by a person who is or has been in a social relationship of a romantic or intimate nature with the victim.  The existence of such a relationship shall be determined based on the reporting party’s statement and with consideration of:  the length of the relationship; the type of relationship; and the frequency of interaction between the persons involved in the relationship. Dating violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse, but excludes acts covered under domestic violence.

    Domestic Violence*: The term “domestic violence” means violence committed by a current or former spouse or intimate partner of the victim, by a person with whom the victim shares a child in common, by a person who is cohabitating with or has cohabitated with the victim as a spouse or intimate partner, by a person similarly situated to a spouse of the victim under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred, or by any other person against an adult or youth victim who is protected from the person’s acts under the domestic or family violence laws of the jurisdiction in which the crime of violence occurred. Domestic violence includes, but is not limited to, sexual or physical abuse or the threat of such abuse.

    *Dating and domestic violence are covered by the Policy whether or not it involves sexual conduct.

  • Stalking

    While the definitions of “stalking” vary from state to state, the University defines stalking as a course of conduct directed at a specific person that would cause a reasonable person to fear for the person’s safety or the safety of others, or suffer substantial emotional distress.  For purposes of this definition, course of conduct means two or more acts, including, but not limited to, acts in which a person directly, indirectly, or through third parties, by any action, method, device, or means, follows, monitors, observes, surveils, threatens, or communicates with another person, or interferes with that person’s property.

    Stalking may occur through face-to-face contact, voyeurism, and/or electronic communications (i.e. cyberstalking).

  • Retaliation

    JHU’s policies against discrimination, including the Sexual Misconduct Policy and Procedures and the Discrimination and Harassment Policy and Procedures, strictly prohibit retaliation against individuals who file complaints, who are witnesses in an investigation or oppose discrimination, including sexual harassment and sexual violence. In general, retaliation includes actions that would have dissuaded a reasonable person from complaining or participating in an investigation.

    The term “retaliation” means intimidating, threatening, coercing, harassing, taking adverse employment or educational action against, and/or otherwise discriminating against an individual in any way because the individual made a report or complaint under this Policy or these Procedures, participated in any way in the investigation or resolution of such a report or complaint, opposed conduct that they reasonably believed to be prohibited under this Policy, these Procedures, or applicable law regarding discrimination or harassment, or exercised any right or responsibility under this Policy or these Procedures.  Retaliation includes conduct that is reasonably likely to deter an individual from making a complaint or report under this Policy or from participating in the investigation or resolution of a complaint or report, or from opposing conduct that they reasonably believe to be prohibited under this Policy, these Procedures, or applicable law regarding discrimination or harassment.

    Some examples of conduct that may constitute retaliation are:

    • Removal from a student group because that student has complained or participated in an OIE investigation
    • Providing a lower-than-deserved grade to a student (or performance review to an employee) because they filed a complaint
    • Spreading false rumors about a complainant because they filed an OIE complaint